A Conversation with Christiana Figueres

Published by Ocean Generation \ April 20, 2018 10:58 am

Ocean Generation proudly hosted an afternoon of activities for the Ocean and Climate Youth Ambassadors representing Small Island Developing States (SIDS), currently traveling on board the Japanese Peace Boat. The day was a huge success, and important discussions around young people involved in climate and ocean activism were addressed.

The day began in Hoxton east London, at CUB, a totally sustainable and zero waste restaurant. Four inspiring activists both from the Peace Boat and the London area, gave short presentations on what needs to happen in art, business, politics and activism to help our oceans. Each young advocate gave their expertise on ways each eld can strengthen communities on a local and global level to help keep our planet clean.

After lunch, we headed to Dalston Pier, an industrial space set up to host a conversation with Christiana Figueres, former Executive Secretary of the UN Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC). Christiana and two young leaders from the Peace Boat spoke about the reality of climate change on SIDS, chaired by Richard Black from the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit. The space quickly filled with journalists, influencers, other non-profit members and individuals whom are passionate about contributing to a better planet.

From the outset the conversation started with a bang, Christiana dropped hard hitting facts, and motivation to create a change. She discussed the commitments she has made over the years to this cause, and discussed how each and everyone of us have a moral obligation to do our bit. The conversation then opened up to the audience that asked thought provoking questions to the panelists, such as, “Should we and how can we all go cold turkey on plastic?” and “Should developed countries that contributed to the majority of greenhouse gases, be responsible

for climate refugees, displaced because of global warming?”. A stimulating and dynamic conversation was engaged, and it was a unique opportunity for audience members from London to interact with the young ambassadors from the Peace Boat that face the most hard hitting e ects of climate change every single day.

The event ended with a beautiful and moving poem from Selina Leema young climate advocate from the Marshall Islands, whom described the nuclear and climate devastation the people from her home endure.

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