Arts for Education. Blue Dot Generation.

Published by Ocean Generation \ February 28, 2019 5:09 pm

In early October 2018, our founder Daisy Kendrick was invited by Blue Dot Generation, an organisation that promotes the use of arts for education, to moderate ‘Implementing sustainable practices into our daily lives’ panel at the House of Vans London.

Blue Dot Generation curate events that bring together artists, musicians, professionals and scientists to encourage a change in the relationship between people and the blue planet. Running workshops to inspire and engage local communities through art in schools, community centres and clubs across the UK.

With over 1,000 people visiting the ‘Arts for Education’ exhibition, the House of Vans came alive with crowds of people of all ages and walks of life. The exhibition led viewers on a powerful journey. Divided into 4 sections: The Toxic Dot, The Jeopardised Dot, The Blue Dot and The Discarded Dot. With works focusing on plastic as a toxic material, artists looked at both the positive and negative relationship between humans and the environment and with a peak into a dystopian future looking back on the impact of plastic during the oil age.

A music gig showed the power that can be generated when we connect to environmental issues through music. The panel discussions were educational, revealing the shocking truth but also suggesting alternative ways to live more sustainable. Daisy was joined on the panel by Gini Newton (Co-Founder Karma Cans), Francesca Harris (PhD student in Nutrition and Sustainability ) and Connor Bryant (Co-Founder Loop Innovations).

The conversation took a realistic approach to changing our daily behaviours, perhaps it is not about avoiding plastic completely, but about cutting down, re-using and disposing responsibly. We are all here on the planet to solve the problem and we will, we asked the audience not to feel powerless, but instead find their niche and use it do good. By using our passions as a means of expression we can generate a positive movement and response to environmental issues.

The Blue Dot Generation event helped encourage a consciousness and an important conversation on both a personal level and through collaboration.

See more of Blue Dot Generation’s upcoming workshops and exhibitions here ;

https://www.bluedotgeneration.org/

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